Here Come The Vikings

There are few cars in today’s day and age that are truly worth their weight in gold. Some Hyper Cars on the market today are fast and exclusive, but their prices are just too inflated for what they are. However, within the deep cracks of the used car world are some true diamonds. And not just any diamonds, I mean full on Type IIa diamonds. The car I present to you today is just exactly that. Feast your eyes on what is easily the most exclusive, the rarest, and probably one of the quickest cars I have ever been lucky enough to see in person: the Koenigsegg CCXR Trevita. 

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For those of you who know nothing about Koenigsegg, here’s a brief introduction. Koenigsegg is a Swedish car brand founded in 1994 by the mad lad himself, Christian von Koenigsegg. At the age of 22, Christian set off to make his dream of building his own car come true. He originally set up shop in Olofström, but was quickly outgrowing the space. By 1997 the company needed more space and moved to a farm just outside Ängelholm. In February of 2003 their production facility caught on fire thus resulting in them moving to an abandoned airfield where the company has since resided. Their first prototype, the CC, was designed and finished in 1996. This car was officially unveiled at the 2000 Paris Motor Show and later became the CC8S, Koenigsegg’s first production car. The CC8S turned into the CCX in 2006, Koenigsegg’s first world-wide production car. When 2007 came around Koenigsegg unveiled the CCXR, a hardcore varient of the CCX. Finally, in 2009, Koenigsegg revealed plans for their most exclusive car, the CCXR Trevita. 

Now that we’re up to speed on the brand, let’s discuss the CCXR Trevita. CCX stands for Competition Coupé X, X commemorating the 10th anniversary of Koenigsegg’s completion and test drive of the CC. Trevita is a Swedish abbreviation for “three whites”. This makes sense as the CCXR Trevita’s body is made up of white carbon fiber. This is a crucial thing to know. Before the CCXR Trevita, car companies were forced to use black carbon fiber weave as it was the only way to make the material. However, Koenigsegg developed their own unique solution for the Trevita that turned the weave into a silvery white color. Originally Koenigsegg had plans to make three of these cars, but due to the incredible difficulty in making white carbon fiber, the idea was limited to just two models instead. Hence the reason why this car isn’t just rare, it’s almost priceless.

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Rarity aside, this machine is an absolute monster. Powered by Koenigsegg’s own 4.8 L V8, the CCXR produces 1018 BHP at 7000 RPM with a maximum torque of 796 ft/lb at 5600 RPM. What this means is that the Trevita is capable of 0-62 MPH in an easy 2.9 seconds with a top speed of 254 MPH. What’s even scarier is that this behemoth only weighs a mere 2821 lbs or 1.41 tons. Keep in mind, a Fiat 500 weighs in at roughly 2,512 lbs or 1.256 tons. So, the Trevita is not only incredibly rare, but also unbearably quick. 

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Obviously because this car is rare and powerful, you may expect the original buyers to be of the world’s most elite and God-like humans. Well, you’re almost correct. One original owner happened to be Floyd Mayweather, one of the world’s most legendary boxers. The other lucky person: Hans Thomas Gross, an incredibly wealthy man apparently best known for dating Paris Hilton. The chassis up for grabs at Illusso in California is speculated to be Mayweather’s as his is the only one reportedly ever put up for sale. The car boasts a staggering 3,100 mile odometer with a measly price of $99,999,999.99. Only kidding, you have to call for the price. If I had to estimate though, I could see this car selling for $10,000,000 or more easily. You may think that’s an outrageous price for such a thing, but again, there’s only 2 of these in the world with this one being the only one up for grabs. Furthermore, it’s quite literally irreplaceable and easily one of the best cars ever produced in automotive history. 

You can find the car for sale at this link.

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